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Once again: Privacy promises from a company are worth nothing, because companies can’t promise anything

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In the last post, I recalled that the only thing that matter whether data collection is taking place is whether it’s technically possible, and that if you carry an electronic sensor, you must assume it to be active. Here’s why it doesn’t matter one bit if the sensor was made with “good guys” with exemplary and outstanding Terms and Conditions.

If data collection is possible, it is happening, and it will be used against the person it was collected from. That’s a reality which is provable with mathematical precision: the probability for data being collected is nonzero, and the probability for it being used against its owner is also some nonzero probability. Since neither of these probabilities are falling over time, then they will take place, with mathematical certainty. Therefore, the only way to have data not used against you is to make sure it’s not possible to collect it in the first place.

I hear a lot of people looking at “good guy” companies, and how they are standing up for privacy, so you can trust them with certainty. This is good, but it is not enough: a company can not just get a new management, it is also completely at the mercy of the government it is operating under.

In effect, a company does not even have agency to promise to protect any collected data. A few case studies:

In the Terms of Service of Dropbox, it was first stated that the files are encrypted, and that Dropbox employees are incapable of accessing your data. At some point, Dropbox mentioned that they’re doing server-side deduplication to store space. This is a compression technique where similar segments of files

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